How to Setup Docker for Usenet

setup docker

Docker is a lightweight platform designed for creating, deploying, and running applications in a reliable and controlled computing environment. While most applications try to be as inclusive as possible by having separate releases for all popular operating systems, success isn’t always guaranteed for each update. This is where Docker comes in: it can host your applications and update with each new release; all while staying system agnostic. 

The Usenet community has found Docker particularly handy given the many applications they have to set up.Hosting them all in Docker containers enables easier setup, maintenance, and updates. 

Let us walk you through the installation and setup for Docker itself as well as give you a quick example setup for Usenet (using SABnzbd and NZBGet). 

Installation

Docker Engine is available on multiple platforms including desktops (macOS, Windows) and Linux servers (CentOS, Debian, Fedora and Ubuntu).

The community created the following table to help you choose the right installation for your system: 

Docker’s documentation website has some amazing resources and provides a comprehensive walk-through for each installation type.

Once the installation is complete, click Docker’s whale icon to make sure it was successful.

 Setup

Docker is an incredibly useful platform that allows you to have all your Usenet apps running in one place. There are dozens of setup possibilities to get the most out of your Usenet subscription. However, for this guide, we kept things simple and used the two most popular newsreaders: SABnzbd and NZBGet.

Install Images

Start by creating a Docker ID and logging into the application. Then you want to select the “Registry” option on the left side of the window. It will open a search panel. Type the names of the programs you want to use into the search box, then select them when they show up in the results.

 SABnzbd

NZBGet

 Right click and select “Download this image” for each program.

You can now select which version you want to download by choosing the appropriate tag in the drop-down list. Unless there’s a specific reason not to, stick to the latest version.

Once you’ve downloaded all your images, you can find them under the “Image” tab on the left hand side of the window.

App Configurations

SABnzbd

Use this snippet to configure your SABnzbd container:

docker run -d \
–name=sabnzbd \
-e PUID=1000 \
-e PGID=1000 \
-e TZ=Europe/London \
-p 8080:8080 \
-p 9090:9090 \
-v /path/to/data:/config \
-v /path/to/downloads:/downloads #optional \
-v /path/to/incomplete/downloads:/incomplete-downloads #optional \
–restart unless-stopped \
ghcr.io/linuxserver/sabnzbd

It’s worth knowing what these lines of code mean. Check the Docker hub documentation regarding SABnzbd setup for more details. 

Once you configure SABnzbd in Docker, you will need to configure the app itself. You can follow our regular guide here (skip the installation section; as you have already accomplished that on Docker.

NZBGet

docker run -d \
–name=nzbget \
-e PUID=1000 \
-e PGID=1000 \
-e TZ=Europe/London \
-p 6789:6789 \
-v /path/to/data:/config \
-v /path/to/downloads:/downloads #optional \
-v /path/to/incomplete/downloads:/incomplete-downloads #optional \
–restart unless-stopped \
ghcr.io/linuxserver/nzbget

It’s worth knowing what these lines of code mean. Check the Docker hub documentation regarding NZBGet setup for more details. 

Once you configure NZBGet in Docker, you will need to configure the app itself. You can follow our regular guide here (skip the installation section; as you have already accomplished that on Docker).

Bottom Line

App configurations are a significant stumbling block for a lot of users trying to get started on Usenet and set up automation. Docker is a fairly easy program to download and learn how to use that makes working with other automation applications a lot simpler in the long run.

In other words: take the time to set up Docker. You won’t regret it.

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